Best (Damn) Prime Rib Recipe


For Oven or Smoker start with Step 1-4

 

1.      Take some peeled pieces of garlic, insert a steak knife into the roast about 1/3 of the thickness and push the garlic down in the hole.

2.      Choose an oil to help seal spices onto the roast, and choose the spice combination you would like.

Typical spices include: garlic powder, seasoning salt, pepper, paprika, rosemary, basil – brown sugar or Worcestershire sauce can be added sparingly.  Insert others as desired and make sure you don’t overdo the salt.

3.      Pre-mix the spices you prefer in a bowl to get solid consistency and mixture.  Then sprinkle the mix on each side of the roast and stick it to the roast with your hand by rubbing it in using some of the selected oil in step #1.  Do one side at a time to prevent spices from falling off the meat.

4.      Refrigerate and cover for a minimum of 12 hours before cooking.

 

Oven:

 

1.      When cooking in an oven, put the roast on a pre-greased rack in a pan. The roast should not be contacting any of the sides of the pan.

2.      Pre-heat oven on broil to 500 degrees.

3.      Insert the roast into the oven and let it sear for about 10-20 minutes depending on the size of the roast and the level of char you want on it.

Note: this is going to smoke up the house like crazy, make sure fans are on, our windows/doors are open as needed.  The smoke will stop when you move to step 4.

4.      When the roast has reached the desired char level, turn the heat down to 225, and add water to the bottom of your pan to about a ½” depth across the pan.

5.      At 225 you can plan on cooking for about 15 minutes per pound of meat, however internal temperature and cooking level can vary based on the cut of meat you have.  Internal temperature for medium rare is around 115 for medium rare and 130 for medium.  If using a thermometer the roast will rise another 5-10 degrees after you remove the heat from it once you hit 115.

6.      Allow the roast to rest for at least 20 minutes under aluminum foil before slicing it.  Use the water from step #4 to make au-jus if desired.

 

Smoker–Slow

 

1.       Start the smoker pre-heating to its highest setting.  As the temperature climbs place the roast directly on the rack when the smoker reaches 200 degrees.

2.      Let the smoker continue to climb in temperature until it reaches 500 degrees, at that mark let the roast cook for 5 minutes then drop the temperature to 225.

3.      At 225 you can plan on cooking for about 15 minutes per pound of meat, however internal temperature and cooking level can vary based on the cut of meat you have.  Internal temperature for medium rare is around 115 for medium rare and 130 for medium.  If using a thermometer the roast will rise another 5-10 degrees after you remove the heat from it once you hit 115.

4.      About 15 degrees prior to reaching you desired internal temperature turn the smoker down to the lowest smoke setting and wait for the meat to slowly reach the desired level.

5.      On a smoker you can hold the meat a little longer than an oven cooked roast so don’t be afraid to start a little early to gain more smoke flavor by letting the roast rest on the low smoke level.  Alternatively you can remove the roast from the smoker and store it in the oven at 150 degrees with a foil tent to hold it over if you need the smoker for other meats.  The biggest risk on a smoker is drying the meat out by trying to cook it too fast.

6.      Allow the roast to rest for at least 20 minutes under aluminum foil with no heat before slicing it.

 

Smoker–Fast

 

1.      Start the smoker pre-heating to its highest setting.  As the temperature climbs place the roast directly on the rack when the smoker reaches 200 degrees.

2.      Let the smoker continue to climb in temperature until it reaches 500 degrees, hold the temperature at 500 degrees.

3.      Cook for about 10 minutes per pound.

4.      Remove from heat and let rest for 20 minutes.

5.      Slice and serve

 

This only works with high fat content meat, and smaller roasts that heat from the outside in faster than a large roast.  Be careful with this method.


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